About

William Baran-Mickle

Articles by


William Baran-Mickle

Article
Beneath Surface and Form

Lynne Hull is a vessel maker as well as a teacher, a jeweler, and a founding member of the Seattle Metals Guild. She is a supporter of the community she lives in. This is evident in her pride of place, the Pacific Northwest, when she has the chance…

Article
Ellen Kochansky: Along the Way

For someone who began making jewelry in high school and who usually makes work no larger than two feet, working on an scale of six feet is quite an education. My first such work, Along The Way, is a 6 x 6 foot wall relief, and it was the winning……

Article
Frederick A. Miller

Over the last several years museums from around the country have been quietly purchasing sterling hollow ware made by Cleveland silversmith Frederick Miller. One of the most recent acquisitions was a silver and ebony pitcher collected by…

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Interior Motives

Myra Mimlitsch Gray’s work encompasses a broad scope of social issues brought to light by an equally broad range of styles and techniques; but none are as they normally appear. The artist’s work challenges our assumptions about the things…

Article
Lloyd E Herman

While managing the renovation of the Smithsonian’s Arts and Industries Building, Lloyd Herman had a vision. In an independent proposal he created the idea that would become the Renwick Gallery. Over the 15 years that he served as its founding

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Mark Stanitz: Material Evidence

The life and work of Mark Stanitz are a study in balances and contrasts. His physical life is lived in a structured, thoughtful and mannered way. His inner world is worked out through his artwork with an unquestioned faith. With the exception…

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Off the Centerline

Off the Centerline In every profession there are highly visible and energetic ambassadors. And then, there are those who act on a more modest level, becoming a valuable part of the profession’s infrastructure. Michael Jerry is one…

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Tom Markusen: Holloware Maker with Integrity

It may surprise some, judging from Tom Markusen studio output, that the production objects are handmade, without the use of dyes, props or molds. The objects are smithed straight from the forge, from red to black heat, from the mid-section…

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