Gold and silver smithing is one of the oldest artistic crafts known to humanity. It has a long tradition in Europe in particular. The oldest goldsmiths guild in the world is 775 years old and is located in Braunschweig. But what would the craft be without those young innovators who continue to incorporate new impulses and fresh ideas into jewelry design. To promote the creative new talents of the profession, the Central Association of German Goldsmiths, Silversmiths and Jewelers (ZV) from Konigstein launched the ‘Young Cellinis’ competition in 2006.

Young Cellinis

Simon Peters

Anne Wiedau

Teresa Kleineidam

The competition is named after the Italian Renaissance goldsmith and sculptor Benvenuto Cellini (1500-1571), who was a headstrong and revolutionary figure of his time. Overall, 52 budding young goldsmiths, silversmiths and jewelry designers submitted their work. Provided with 50 grams of sterling silver, sponsored by the Allgemeine Goldund Silberscheideanstalt Pforzheim, they went to work. Six winning pieces were then selected in September by a panel of experts at the Ruhle-Diebener-Verlag publishers in Stuttgart. Each winner received a prize of 1,000 euros, donated by the ZV, the GZ, the Inhorgenta Europe and the Jewellery Relation Group (JRG).

Participants could choose from three different themes. Two designs from each category were awarded prizes. The first topic was “Jewelry which grows with you for the most precious things in our lives, our children”. Teresa Kleineidam from Hildesheim impressed the judges with a ring which incorporates a locket. Small photos can be inserted into the ring. New stages in the life of the child can therefore be incorporated into the jewelry by simply changing the pictures. Photo albums grow with the child. The ring therefore gains a charming and different appearance with each new picture. The second winning entrant in this category was Anne Wiedau from Coesfeld. Her ring is versatile and can be worn by a person from childhood to adulthood. It is suitable as a chain pendant or keyring and the clown’s face can be removed at a later date to transform the piece into a decorative ring with the attachable cultivated pearl.

Ganoksin is sponsored by

Carina Primus

Anna Nurminger

Magdalena Boch

The second topic resolved around “Memory jewelry for passing exams”. In this category the “cheat sheet concealer” by Carina Primus from Gelsenkirchen impressed the judges. This technically well-crafted pendant stores a cheat sheet completely discreetly. A turning mechanism enables it to be easily reactivated for a new exam. Simon Peters from Paderborn also impressed the jury with his visually and technically sophisticated brooch in the form of a picture frame. This enables exam notes to be stashed in the frame.

The third category produced interesting results under the topic of “Free time jewelry for young men and women”. The pin-on jewelry by Anna Nurminger from Gunzenhausen can help single people still on the look-out. The variable play of colors can signal a particular mood and status of the liaison to potential flirting partners. Magdalena Boch from Billerbek developed a belt for going to parties and discos. The buckle is fitted with several compartments for storing your ID and keys. Rectangular openings where the wearer can insert ID, thus displaying the portrait photo and name, enable the wearer to prove their identity or communicate with others. A discreet alternative to the conspicuous name badge at singles parties? The winning entries can be seen on an exhibition wall.

www.zv-gold.de