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Sizing a Platinum Ring Using Pulse-arc Welding Technology
By: Mark B. Mann
Technical Contributions by Steece Hermanson, Galloway and Moseley, Sumter, SC
Copyright © Mark Mann 2004
 
 

Sizing and torch welding a platinum ring with diamonds channel set down the shank could be risky to the diamonds. Use of a Pulse-arc Welder for this welding job will eliminate the risk and potential damage.

This platinum ring requires sizing and setting of the center diamond to be prepared for delivery to the customer. For sizing, Hermanson uses the following pulse-arc-welding procedures to complete the task.
Hermanson first prepares the sizing joint by sawing and filing. He prepares the joint with an open angle completely around it. He traps a piece of platinum 0.40 millimeters wide between the shanks. Notice the piece is about a half millimeter larger than the shank dimensions.

For this procedure, Hermanson sets the ABI Pulse-arc-Welder to the high energy setting at 50 volts. With the pencil attached to the positive lead using the #4 weld tip, he directs a pulse of energy at the joint from the top. After inspection, he increases the voltage to 60 volts.

The clip lead is attached to the negative terminal and clamped onto the tweezers holding the ring. Using a few pulses of energy, he completes the welding at the top portion of the shank.

The weld is complete across the top of the shank.
He's now holding the ring with the clip lead. This allows him to easily maneuver the ring to weld each side of the shank and inside the ring. When completed, the surface of the metal welded into the shank is slightly higher than the shank itself. He taps the excess metal with a hammer then finishes the ring.
Once completed, there may be a working pit or two along the seam. If this is the case, Hermanson uses a small ball burr to open the pit. He then fills it using 29 gauge platinum wire and the same equipment settings. The finishing was easily accomplished and the ring is ready for the center diamond.

Important: Tack-, fusion- and pulse-arc equipment settings will differ and are based upon the volume, amount of contact and alloy of the material you are working with. Practicing using like materials will give you a parameter for the settings required for your application. Keep a record of settings and tasks for future reference.

   
 

Photographs - Mark B. Mann

All rights reserved internationally. Copyright © Mark Mann. Users have permission to download the information and share it as long as no money is made-no commercial use of this information is allowed without permission in writing from Mark Mann.