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Library >  Stone Setting
 
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[866] 950 Palladium: Gemstone Setting Considerations
Setting gemstones in 950 palladium alloys is a bench jeweler's dream. Stone setters will agree that the combination of palladium's malleability, superior strength and the near absence of memory (spring-back) when it is bent or formed all set the foundation for success, regardless of the setting style. But without proper design (structural support, sufficient metal, accurate fit, etc.), planning and execution of workmanship, the unique and positive characteristics of palladium cannot be used to the best advantage. More importantly, ignoring the working characteristics of the metal could lead to problems for the jewelry through normal wear, such as mountings becoming misshapen resulting in loss of gemstones. The following review of gemstone setting specifically in palladium alloys presents some jewelry examples for consideration.... (2007)
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Show me more articles from: [Visual Communications]|[Mark B. Mann]
Releated Categories: [Palladium Fabrication]|[Stone Setting]

 

[225] A Lesson in Invisible Setting
This column is from the At the Bench column that appears every month in AJM. For this project, it is assumed that you have prepared the mounting and acquired the grooved stones for invisible setting. The use of a microscope or 10x eye loupe can be crucial when working with the tight tolerances involved in the invisible setting process.... (2003)
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Show me more articles from: [AJM]|[Blaine Lewis]
Releated Categories: [Stone Setting]
ISBN: B00006K39S

 

[143] Basic bead setting
First the stone's diameter is measured at the pavillion and a dent is made in the metal for the pilot drill (about 1mm diameter). Then the metal is drilled through. The metal is drilled again until the hole is about 3/4 the size of the stone's diameter. Lubricate the drill bit. As long as there is a 0.3 mm seat left there is enough to set with.... (2002)
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Show me more articles from: [Brain Press Publications]|[Charles Lewton-Brain]
Releated Categories: [Stone Setting]

 

[141] Basic Gypsy (flush mount) Setting
First the stone's diameter is measured at the pavillion and a dent is made in metal for the pilot drill (about 1mm diameter). Then the metal is drilled The metal is drilled again until the hole is about 3/4 the size of the diameter. Lubricate the drill bit. As long as there is a 0.3 mm seat left there enough to set with. It is an easy mistake not to take out enough metal, 3/4 of diameter of the stone is probably a bigger final drill bit than you think. Hold it top of the stone to see how much stone sticks out on each side of the bit.... (2002)
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Show me more articles from: [Brain Press Publications]|[Charles Lewton-Brain]
Releated Categories: [Stone Setting]

 

[250] Bead Stone Setting - Bead It!
Bench Jewelers often use different methods to accomplish the same work. I believe the end results are what is important, not the method used to get there. In jewelry work the ends often justifies the means. This is not more evident than in bead setting. I know jewelers who cut the seat with round, bud, cone, setting, heart, or bearing burs. Then they cut the excess metal away with flat, knife, or onglette gravers, or they use heart, wheel, round, or knife edge burs. Some even use needle files or saw blades.... (2003)
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Show me more articles from: [BWSimon]|[Bradney W. Simon]
Releated Categories: [Stone Setting]

 

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