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Excerpts from: GIA
Page: 2 3 4 5 
 
[938] A Sneaky Goldsmith Trick to Detail-Finish Problem Areas
Every bench jeweler has experienced the frustration of trying to sand and polish a nearly inaccessible area on a piece of jewelry. The goldsmith who can detail these small corners and crevices can bring his or her work up to the level of fine jewelry. Anything that gives the work a cleaner, more attractive look translates into greater sales in the showcase.... (2011)
Complete Story

Show me more articles from: [GIA]|[Douglas W. Canivet]
Releated Categories:[Bench Tips & Tricks]|[Polishing]

 

[988] Bench Tip: Avoid Stone Loss With Quality Assurance Benchmarks
Fine jewelry represents much more than its trade value in diamonds, gemstones and precious metals. It is a personal representation of the owner´s lifestyle, status, emotion, recognition, commitment and more. That significance only amplifies how devastating the loss of a gemstone is for the owner. Even one missing accent stone renders the jewelry unwearable. Loss of a significant gemstone will also impact the retailer who sold the piece and the manufacturer who engineered and produced it. The loosening, damage or loss of gemstones in jewelry can be attributed to two factors: poor workmanship or the absence of benchmarking standards for setting. Benchmarks are specific parameters used to compare and evaluate the acceptability of a finished product for market. Stone loss can be avoided. Inspecting each piece and comparing it against established benchmarks for signs of vulnerability in normal wear gives the jeweler/manufacturer an opportunity to address potential problems before jewelry is offered for sale. Adopting consistent task-specific benchmarks encourages sound design and good workmanship, assuring the quality of jewelry for the consumer.... (2012)
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Show me more articles from: [GIA]|[Mark B. Mann]
Releated Categories:[Bench Tips & Tricks]|[Stone Setting]

 

[989] Bench Tip: How to Make Spiral-Cut Rubber Molds
n this installment we present a mold cutting technique called a spiral cut, which is designed to facilitate the successful release of a cage-like wax model from a mold.... (2012)
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Show me more articles from: [GIA]|[GIA Staff]
Releated Categories:[Mold Making]

 

[990] Bench Tip: How to Make Spiral-Cut Rubber Molds
Small, fine drill bits used for jewelry making will become dull with normal use. Worn cutting edges make tasks more difficult and time-consuming and can cause costly accidents, including damage to jewelry and gemstones or even injury. Maintaining the cutting surfaces on your tools will ensure clean, consistent work at the bench. This installment will teach you how to sharpen the cutting edges of a fine drill bit. There are different styles of bit tips, but this example features a chisel tip. Let´s begin with a look at its anatomy.... (2012)
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Show me more articles from: [GIA]|[Mark B. Mann]
Releated Categories:[Bench Tips & Tricks]|[Small Tools]

 

[954] Bench Tip: Use a Split Mandrel for Finishing Round Bezels
A bench jeweler typically uses a split mandrel to sand and finish the inside of a ring. Various grits of abrasive papers can be cut to size and inserted into the slit of the mandrel, where they are held by friction during the rotary filing process. With minor modification, you can use the split mandrel as a holding device to finish round bezels and other small jewelry components quickly and consistently..... (2011)
Complete Story

Show me more articles from: [GIA]|[Don Hughes]
Releated Categories:[Bench Tips & Tricks]|[Stone Setting]

 

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